Sandhill Crane on Center Island

Sandhill Crane on Center Island

Sandhill Crane on Center Island  Sandhills seem to adapt well to their environment. They are very smart birds.  A nesting pair was standing along the road as I went by.  They waited for the traffic to clear, then crossed two lanes of a four lane highway to the center island.  This image was captured after I made a U-turn and headed back.  They were in no hurry to cross the other two lanes and seemed quite at ease with cars passing by.

Great Blue Heron Fishing

Great Blue Heron Fishing

Great Blue Heron Fishing  On my walkabouts, it’s easy to pass up species common to the area like the Great Blue Heron.  Great Blue Heron are both common and beautiful.  With changing light particularly late in the day, several images of the same heron can look quite different.  And, if the heron are accustomed to people in the area, it does not take a very long lens to capture nice images.

Eastern Kingbird

Eastern Kingbird

Eastern Kingbird  How did I get that close with 110mm?  On a Nikon 1 V3 with a 2.7 crop factor, 110mm becomes 297mm.  Also, I was in a kayak drifting without paddling toward the bird.  The branch it’s perched upon is about 5 feet off the water.  Its nest is below it, about 2 feet off the water.  Yes, I stopped the drift and did not threaten the bird or its nest.  This bird looks like an Eastern Kingbird to me.  Certainly, I’m not a birder.  If you think it’s another type of bird, please contact me.

Sandhill Crane

Sandhill Cranes on the Platte River

Sandhill Crane  Every os often on my walkabouts, I’ll see a Sandhill Crane.  Every year a nesting pair comes back to a small lake along my walkabout path.  Still, they stay pretty much in a secluded part of the lake so sightings are rare.  In this image, the light is pretty hard since it was captured midday.  Still nice to see them make their home nearby.

Loon

Loon

Loon  This Loon was hunting.  Yes, hunting!  Loons find their prey by sight, underwater.  They eat mainly fish along with an occasional on crayfish, frog, snail, salamander, or leech.  They prefer clear lakes to more easily see their prey through the water, where it can use its pointy bill to stab or grasp prey.