Tower Falls

Tower Falls

Tower Falls fed by Tower Creek plunges 132 feet about a 1,000 yards upstream from the creek’s confluence with the Yellowstone River.  Its name comes from the rock pinnacles at the top of the falls.  From the Tower Falls overlook where this image was captured, the trail to the bottom is one-mile round trip. The trail descends about 300 feet in a half mile. The hike back up is steep and strenuous.

Undine Falls

Undine Falls

Undine Falls is four miles east of Mammoth in Yellowstone NP.  It’s one of the the few waterfalls in Yellowstone visible from the roadway and accessible by a short hike.  The falls, along a section of Lava Creek, is approximately 60 feet in height, descending over two tiers of basaltic rock.  Undine received its present name in 1885 from geologist Arnold Hague. Undine was named for wise, female water spirits from German mythology who lived around waterfalls.

Lower Falls at Grand Canyon of Yellowstone

Lower Falls at Grand Canyon of Yellowstone

Lower Falls at Grand Canyon of Yellowstone  At 308 feet, the Lower Falls is the tallest waterfall in Yellowstone. It’s more than twice as high as Niagara Falls. The amount of water flowing over the falls varies greatly from 63,500 gal/sec in the spring to 5,000 gal/sec in the fall.  Getting a photograph closer to the base along the Yellowstone River requires a fairly strenuous hike down to the river bed.  Someday, I’ll take the time to hike down and, oh yes, back up.

Yellowstone’s Gibbon Falls

Yellowstone's Gibbon Falls

Yellowstone’s Gibbon Falls  Yes, I’m back on my Yellowstone kick today.  Gibbon Falls lies along on the Gibbon River about halfway between Norris Geyser Basin and Madison Junction.  The falls tumble about 80 feet in a gradual descent.  Although parking area near the top of the falls which provides a great viewpoint, a hike to the base of the falls for a nicer image from the viewing area is virtually impossible.

Firehole Falls at Yellowstone NP

Firehole Falls at Yellowstone NP

Firehouse Falls at Yellowstone NP  There’s nothing like Yellowstone in the winter.   It’s my favorite time to visit the park; wish I was there.  Firehole Falls at Yellowstone NP lies about a hundred feet below the road.  It’s a bit of a decent and climb back up to get this shot; it’s dangerous.  Actually, the rangers have now blocked off the way down to the river.  Probably, too many people were falling; it’s really steep.  I was the only fool from the snow coach to make the trip to the river bottom.   I would not try it again without an experienced climbing buddy and a rope.  Once along the river, what a reward.  Firehole Falls aren’t real tall; just majestic.   To capture this image, I used a tripod with its feet in the water.  The river bank hugs the canyon wall so there’s not much room to maneuver.  I tried to fall in the river, but luckily was unsuccessful.  By the way, this image is not a B&W.