Husky Dogsled Party | Thru a Husky’s Eyes

Husky Dogsled Party | Thru a Husky's Eyes

Husky Dogsled Party | Thru a Husky’s Eyes  Well yes, only the lead dog gets a clear view of what coming next.  The lead dog must scout the terrain, break a new trail, choose exactly where to run, make sure the ice is not too thin on rivers and lakes, and much more.  Only the smartest, well-trained dogs get the honor of leading the pack.  To see the entire story with all seven images, go to Husky Dogsled Party | a 7 Image Story.

Husky Dogsled Party | a 7 Image Story

Husky Dogsled Party | Dogsled HuskiesHusky Dogsled Party | a 7 Image Story  Each year in January or February, the Free Spirit Siberian Rescue organization hosts a Husky Dogsled event in northern Illinois, with Huskies galore.  Jake and Elwood have gone for the past several years.  They love to run and play in the snow.  They would rather be outside running, playing, working, or just taking a nap in the snow than anything else, except possibly eating.  Elwood has different colored eyes, a fairly common Husky trait.  Although grey and white colors are common in Huskies like Jake, they really come in many color combinations including pure white.

Although it was a beautiful day with intermittent sun and snow showers, the trail had not been groomed like they typically are for races, so the dogs had to break a new trail in the snow.  Rescued Huskies coming to the event can run as part of a dogsled team.   As natural sled pullers, Huskies instinctively know they should pull the sled with other Huskies in their new pack.  When the harnessed dogs are being attached to the sled, they are very excited; barking, jumping, and talking “Husky”.  As soon the musher calls “mush”, the dogs all become quiet and start pulling the sled.  As soon as the sled stops, they go back to barking and howling.

Several dogs in the team were newcomers to dog sledding.  That’s Jake and Elwood in the center of the pack.  This outing was their first time pulling a dogsled and they ran beautifully.  Of course, they were in the middle of the pack.  The lead dogs are the most experienced and the specially trained to be lead dogs.  What many folks don’t know is that the last two dogs are specially trained to be the “wheel dogs.”   Of course, wheel dogs are also the primary view for sled riders.

Each image will be posted individually this week with a bit more narrative under category Husky Dogsled Party.

Click any image below for a slide show!

Big Island Sunsets | Seascape Sunset

Big Island Sunsets | Seascape Sunset

Big Island Sunsets | Seascape Sunset  Seascapes present a bit of a challenge for a Midwesterner.  We just don’t get many chances to photograph them.  Although the Nikon 1 V1 works well in all modes , bracketing would be nice.  To see the entire story with all seven images, go to Big Island Sunsets | a 7 Image Story.

Big Island Sunsets | Warm Sunset

Big Island Sunsets | Warm Sunset

Big Island Sunsets | Warm Sunset  Yes warm, when it’s 80º+F at sunset as you are walking along the beach looking for just the right light.  Notice the beach consists of white sand and small lava rocks; not so easy on bare feet.  To see the entire story with all seven images, go to Big Island Sunsets | a 7 Image Story.

Big Island Sunsets | a 7 Image Story

Big Island Sunsets | Blue HourBig Island Sunsets | a 7 Image Story  As much as winter snow looks so beautiful, warm beaches feel better to most people.  The Big Island, Hawaii, has plenty of warm ( 80º+F) beaches, particularly along the Kona Coast.  The Kona Coast, the western coast of Hawaii, is also considered the sunny side of the island.  The beaches may be white or black sand, aligned along the coastline, between jagged lava rock flows.  These sunset images were captured along a northwestern shoreline path; pointing northwest toward Maui.  Maui appears in the background of each image.   Look closely; you may see Maui’s volcano, Haleakalā, (“house of the sun”) rising above the clouds, just over 10,000 feet.

While looking for nice light, my nightly walkabouts tended to begin or end along this path. The path follows the shoreline through sand, trees, lava rock, and beach.  Sometimes, the beach consists of sand and small lava rocks; not so easy on bare feet.  When walking along the shoreline path just before sunset, it’s easy to see the rugged nature of the shore.  Capturing decent images can be treacherous when stepping into the water on slippery rocks or walking back after dark.  After dark without any moonlight, the walk gets difficult.  The time just before total darkness has become one of my favorite times to capture sunsets.  Time to think about long exposures.  Although a tripod can also second as a walking stick, sometimes photography should be like scuba diving, where you always have a buddy.  Photographers not only seek the next beautiful image; they also relish the experience of capturing that image.

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‘Twas the Night before Christmas

'Twas the Night before Christmas

Twas the Night before Christmas, when all through the house
Not a creature was stirring, not even a Pug;
The stockings were hung by the chimney with care,
In hopes that Santa Pug soon would be there;

The Pugs were nestled all snug in their beds,
While visions of sugar cookies danced in their heads;
Then all of the sudden, there arose such a clatter,
The Pugs sprang from there beds to see what was the matter;

Away to the window they flew like a flash,
To open the shutters and jump on the sash;
Just in time to hear old St. Pug as he drove out of sight,
Merry Christmas to all, and to all Pugs, a good night.

Inspired by Clement Clarke Moore

Steam Engine Tractor

Steam Engine Tractor

Steam Engine Tractor  A steam tractor is an agricultural vehicle powered by a steam engine usually used for plowing and threshing during the late 19th and early 20th centuries.  Steam tractors were designed specifically for agricultural uses to replace horses for pulling farm implements like plows and later for powering other farming machines.  These tractors were gradually replaced by the mid-1920s with the less expensive tractors using internal combustion engines.   For more information, check out this year’s Threshermen’s Reunion.