Monarch in the Grass

 Monarch in the Grass

Monarch in the Grass  Monarch butterflies are on the decline in our area.  You just don’t see many; even on walkabouts through grasslands.  They lay their eggs on underside of milkweed leaves and use the milkweed for nourishment to grow.  To save the monarch population, we must save milkweed.  In my area, there are plenty of milkweed or so I thought.  Still, the Monarch population appears to be much lower than it once was.

Monarch Butterfly

Monarch Butterfly

Tonight’s walkabout uncovered a male Monarch Butterfly; perhaps the most familiar American butterfly.  Its wings show the recognizable orange and black pattern with a 3-4 inch wingspan.  Female monarchs have darker veins on their wings; the males have a spot in the center of each hind wing.  Males are also slightly larger than female monarchs.  Eastern Monarchs migrate, sometimes thousands of miles, to Mexico in late summer or autumn.   Western Monarchs west of the Rocky Mountains migrate to California.  To capture an image of these amazing butterflies requires an abundance of patience, a decent telephoto lens, and a bit of luck.