Kelly D (experimental)

Kelly D (experimental)

Kelly D (experimental)  The Kelly D is an experimental aircraft made by Noll Roddy Brooks in 1988.  It sort of looks antique, but notice the engine, a Lycoming 0-290.  None the less, it’s one of the many beautiful planes attending the AAA Fly-in.  The experimental airplane must have inspired a bit of artistry in this image.  For a photographer, Antique Field at the AAA Fly-in provides nice backgrounds to explore.

Wolf in a Tree

Wolf in a Tree

Wolf in a Tree  Yup, wolves can and do climb into trees.  Wolf Park provides a refuge for wolves as well as a facility to study their behavior.  A few times a year they allow photographers to capture images impossible to find in the wild.  Although I don’t generally capture captive wildlife, Wolf Park is an exception for me.

B-25 Grumpy

B-25 Grumpy

B-25 Grumpy sat ready at sunset the night before it’s flight as part of 20 B-25s flying to the Air Force Museum for the 70th Doolittle Raider Reunion in April 2012.  Grumpy, built by North American, started service in October 1943 at the USAAF advanced flying school.  After over 1500 flying hours, it was overhauled and sent to lend lease with the RAF.  After the war, it served in the Canadian Northwest Air Command.  After 1962, it was sold to private owners and, at one time, was used as a fire bomber.  In 1887 “Grumpy” was acquired by TFC and restored at Chino; then, flown to the U.K. and placed back in storage.  Finally, in 2008, it was restored to airworthy condition and returned to the USA.  For more information on “Grumpy”. visit TFCs web site.   For a first hand account of B-25 activities at the 70th Doolittle Raider reunion: B-25s at the 70th Doolittle Raiders Reunion.

B-25 Tondelayo

B-25 Tondelayo

B-25 Tondelayo taxiing for take-off at Grimes Field, the base for all B-25s attending the 70th Reunion of the Doolittle Raiders.  For a first hand account of B-25 activities at the reunion: B-25s at the 70th Doolittle Raiders Reunion.  Tondelayo is owned and operated by the Collins Foundation.  To find more information about this distinguished B-25, visit the Tondelayo on the Collins Foundation Website. 

B-25 Nose Art at the 70th Doolittle Raiders Reunion

B-25: Champaign GalB-25 Nose Art at the 70th Doolittle Raiders Reunion  Nose art was very popular with the flight and ground crews of fighters and bombers during WWII.  The B-25s attending the 70th Doolittle Raiders Reunion in April, 2012 had a nice variety of nose art.  There were 20 B-25s that attended the reunion, but you’ll see 21 nose art photos.  So, what gives?  Well, in WWII, some airplanes had nose art on only one side of the nose, others had the same basic art on both sides of the nose, a few had different art on each side of the nose, and a some had no nose art at all.  Of the planes that attended the reunion, all had nose art, but one had different art on each side of its’ nose.

For a first hand account of B-25 activities at the reunion: B-25s at the 70th Doolittle Raiders Reunion.

(Select any image below for a slideshow…)

Champaign Gal belongs to the Champaign Aviation Museum at Grimes Airfield in Urbana, OH where the B-25s were based for the reunion.  Many thanks to them for being such great hosts.  They worked very hard along with Grimes Museum and the airport staff, management, and volunteers to hold a first class event.

To learn more about the Doolittle Raiders, visit their official web siteDoolittle Tokyo Raiders.