Snow Makes the Image | Fence Gate

Snow Makes the Image | Fence Gate

Snow Makes the Image | Fence Gate  This homemade gate opens into fields of grass and wind blown snow.  It stands just east of the Bridger Mountains in Montana ranch country.  It looks like it was made or repaired recently.  It’s just a simple gate made with a post and some barbed wire.  Without the snow, the subject would just blend into the background.  To see the entire story with all seven images, go to Snow Makes the Image | a 7 Image Story.

Snow Makes the Image | Curious Deer

Snow Makes the Image | Curious Deer

Snow Makes the Image | Curious Deer  White-tailed Deer are a curious lot.  As long as they do not feel threatened, they want to know what’s happening.  To me, it’s just amazing how curious they are.  If I were a deer, I’d be wondering if spring were ever going to arrive.  Being a photog instead of a deer, it’s just a great opportunity for a cool image.  To see the entire story with all seven images, go to Snow Makes the Image | a 7 Image Story.

Snow Makes the Image | a 7 Image Story

Snow Makes the Image | Curious DeerSnow Makes the Image | a 7 Image Story  Snow images range from being really boring to very dramatic.  In each of the images in this 7 Image Story, the snow makes the image.  Sometimes, it provides a nice background, which separates the obvious subject and makes stark contrasts.  Other times, falling snow provides a translucent curtain in front of the obvious subject.  And, some images would not be created at all, unless they were on snow.  In fact, in all these images, snow sets the mood of the image.  Snows powers the image and the viewer.

Everyone knows it’s snow; a beautiful change in scenery.  Snow is plain and simple, yet a magical winter wonderland at the same time.  Snow reminds us of earlier, happier, more carefree times in our lives.  It brings a fresh perspective; wiping our world clean and rejuvenating our soul.  You are never too old to play in the snow.

Capturing a good snow image might require a bit of knowledge and skill.  How do you get the metering right in a snow shot so you get the mood you want?   Most of the time, it’s fairly easy as along as something in the frame is not snow.  Just meter normally on a strong non-snow object and let the camera will do the rest.  The snow looks white and the other colors look right.  Unless you want that cold blue effect, the white balance may need some adjustment.  Sometimes, to capture falling snow, the shutter speed must be slowed enough to capture the flakes.  Still, the clicks are relatively simple.

Click any image below for a slide show!

Big Island Sunsets | Blue Hour

Big Island Sunsets | Blue Hour

Big Island Sunsets | Blue Hour  Well, in reality, blue hour usually only lasts about 20 minutes.  During the blue hour the sky has a deep blue hue with saturated colors.  It’s the time after sunset (just after golden hour) before total darkness when lighted colors really stand out, yet the background is still visible.  The different shades of the sky and color saturation make it a great for landscape and seascape photography.  To see the entire story with all seven images, go to Big Island Sunsets | a 7 Image Story.

Big Island Sunsets | Distant Maui

Big Island Sunsets | Distant Maui

Big Island Sunsets | Distant Maui  This image looks toward Maui taken from the northwestern shore of the Big Island.  Look closely and you’ll see Maui’s volcano, Haleakalā, (“house of the sun”) rising above the clouds at 10,023 feet.  It’s a massive shield volcano that forms more than 75% of Maui.  To see the entire story with all seven images, go to Big Island Sunsets | a 7 Image Story.